Africa Airports 2007 Conference

Feb 27 - March 2, Johannesburg, South Africa

Topics to be discussed include:

Successful airport management

Infrastructure and capacity

The relationship between airports and airlines

Facing Africa's unique aviation challenges

Security and safety

The low cost phenomenon

Maximising non-aviation revenue

for airports

Privatisation and concessioning

Africa Airports 2007 is a director-level, interactive conference experience. In its 3rd successful year, airport authorities, airports, suppliers and vendors came together to network and build relationships.  The congress attracted a global audience with overwhelming press support and media coverage.

Africa Airports 2007 is your ultimate aviation experience, addressing the hot topics in the sector and providing you with the year's ultimate industry gathering. Ensure you take part in this customer friendly, cost-effective and big on genuine business contacts event so you can showcase your solutions to your potential clients. 

Plus there's more: interactive panel discussions, roundtable sessions, speed networking and practical case studies give you the best opportunity to learn from and network with key industry players. Speakers and panellist are industry experts and gurus from across the globe and are personally invited through your suggestions.

Develop new relationships at Africa Airports 2007 and ensure your business profits increase


DURBAN, DOUALA, KIGALI ARE THE BEST AIRPORTS IN AFRICA SAYS SKYTRAX SURVEY
 
By Peterson Tumwebaze

KIGALI INTERNATIONAL Airport has been ranked number seven in Africa and the best in East Africa according to the 2014 survey by Skytrax, a UK-based consultancy firm.

Durban King Shaka International Airport is the best in Africa followed by East London, Port Elizabeth and Bloemfontein airports-all in South Africa.

In North Africa, Tunisia’s Tunis, Carthage and Egypt’s Hurghada airports topped the list; while in West Africa, Douala in Cameroon and Algiers Houari in Algeria are the best. The rankings were done on 728 airports worldwide.

World wide, Singapore Changi International Airport emerged the best followed by Incheon airport in South Korea, Munich in Germany and Hong Kong International Airport.

“The ranking is representative of the activity at the Kigali International Airport and the enormous developmental investments and human resource efforts to ensure that Rwanda keeps growing towards the realisation [of the goal to become] an aviation hub in Africa and the world,” said Dr. Richard Masozera, the director general Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority.

The airport has experienced consistent growth in international and domestic passenger numbers from 263, 264 in 2008 to current 600, 000.

Tonny Barigye, the civil aviation’s spokesman said that the significant increase is a result of the country’s steady economic development and efforts to develop alternative modes of transport to address challenges associated with being landlocked.

The airport is currently undergoing renovations and expansion to make it more efficient and in handling growing traffic. Work is expected to be completed next month.

These ratings are based on the quality of products and services, according to Peter Miller, director marketing at Skytrax.

“This means a small regional airport which will have a different range of product and service options – compared to a major, international hub airport – can still be eligible for a high star ranking provided it fulfills the conceived quality target,” Miller said.

Kigali International Airport was ranked the best because of its capacity to respond to disaster-with its fire department in category nine, the second best according to International Aviation Organisation standards.

Kigali was also honoured for being efficient, fast and secure in the checking in process. The airport also scored highly in traffic control systems. “We believe we can do better by working on those areas where we did not score well and with government’s support will achieve a much better position in the next ranking,” Barigye said.

African Airport Profile: One of a Series
Kilimanjaro International: Africa's first fully privatized airport

Africa Travel Magazine's editors look forward to a return to Kilimanjaro to greet first dawn of the New Millennium from Africa's tallest mountain. It's all part of a special tour sponsored by the Tanzania Tourist Board and supported enthusiastically by this magazine. At his very first sight of Kilimanjaro International Airport from the Alliance Air jet, and later at the ATA Tourism Marketing Congress in Arusha, Editor Jerry W. Bird commented that this airport was a place of destiny and opportunity. How true his intuition proved to be, when a news release arrived from London six months later. As we learned by our travels in Tanzania, and several safari experiences, it Is the nearest international airport to the Serengeti and Ngorogoro wildlife reserves. The stage is set for major land development by Mott Macdonald, a £220 million independent development and engineering consultancy working in over 100 countries World-Wide. Its track record in transport ranges from the Channel Tunnel and London's Heathrow Express rail link to Hong Kong's famous Tsing Ma Bridge and new airport terminal.

The firm's airport portfolio also includes design, operational and financial planning of over 50 airports around the world, recently including South Africa's airports in Durban and Cape Town, Toronto's new terminal expansion, Bulgaria's Bourgas airport and TNT's super hub at Lewige. Most of the staff employed by KADCO will be Tanzanians who will undergo a comprehensive training and skills upgrading by the small number of experienced expatriates brought in to assist startup and manage operations during the initial phases. Mott MacDonald Group, St. Anne House, Wellesley Road, Croydon CR 9 2 UL, United Kingdom. Kilimanjaro International Airport is strategically placed to help boost tourism in undeveloped regions of northern Tanzania. It already offers a scheduled service from London's Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol. The airport's 10, 900 hectares of real estate and surrounding land is part of a large, ongoing development.

East African Tourism to reap huge reward
In late 1998, Kilimanjaro Airports Development Company (KADCO) began a 25 year concession to operate Tanzania's Kilimanjaro international airport in a public/private sector joint venture with the Tanzanian Government. This paves the way for much-needed investment in the facility at Kilimanjaro, creating Africa's first fully privatized international airport. Airport management is being provided by Schiphol and operations management by UK CAA International Services, while Mott MacDonald is fulfilling the role of airport general manager and KADCO director. Their first task is to modernize the existing airport facility to bring it up to international standards. This will entail upgrading of safety systems and equipment, staff training, setting up of modern management systems and the long overdue refurbishment of terminal facilities. At the same time KADCO will launch a marketing campaign aimed at developing the airport's tourism potential. More to come.

Associate Editor/ Publisher Muguette Goufrani is producing a special "Air Safaris Section" for the ATA 2000 Congress in Addis Ababa. If you have items on this topic, fax them to Muguette at 604-681-6595 or e-mail airhwy@dowco.com

 

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